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Large Sibling Groups Struggle to Find Foster Parents

The number of sibling groups being referred to CCR continues to rise. Young siblings are entering Wisconsin foster care at alarming rates, primarily due to severe neglect. Sibling pairs and large groups are regularly placed in CCR foster homes in counties across Wisconsin. Most CCR foster families care for siblings or more than one child at a time. When their homes are full, we have no choice but to turn away referrals like a recent sibling group of three. Meet Martia, Jaylan, and Miya, siblings recently referred to CCR in hopes of finding a foster home to meet their elevated needs.

Sibling groups in foster care require more than bedroom space.

Wisconsinites familiar with CCR know that our qualifications to become foster parents focus heavily on flexible schedules. In other words, we need foster parents who can attend multiple weekly appointments and be available to kids when needed most, including after-school and summer breaks. Siblings like Martia, Jaylan, and Miya have trauma histories, require school support, and typically need additional outside services. Without day-to-day flexibility, caring for them and managing schedules would be difficult.

Heather D LI

Martia recently celebrated her birthday. She is four years old and doing well in many areas, considering the neglectful circumstances she came from. Although she is not speaking as fluid as most children her age, she can express herself appropriately and tries her best to communicate effectively. She is a curious little girl who loves to please. She follows and mimics her older sister, Miya, who has been her mother figure for many years. Her attachment to Miya is not unusual with sibling groups when parents or caregivers have not been present or active in the home.

Martia sleeps well and has a healthy appetite. Although potty trained, she has accidents and wears a pull-up at night for occasional bed-wetting. It is reported that she will have tantrums lasting up to 30 minutes. Martia would benefit from socialization with other young children.

Keeping siblings together in foster care can be challenging.

11-year-old Jaylan is a typical boy in many ways. He loves video games and wants to buy a skateboard. He can be wise for his years and is very protective of his sisters. He has good insight and understands the needs of his sisters more than he should. Jaylan needs reminders to be a child, not a caretaker for his sisters. It causes much stress for him. He does not make friends easily and is working on being more social with his peers.

Buchanan Kids

Jaylan spends much time alone, suffers from low self-esteem, and has been diagnosed with depression. He is reported to have problems with anger and tends to keep to himself. He has witnessed significant violence in his family and has been present during drug use and threatening situations. Although he is good at keeping himself occupied independently, he would do well in a family environment, offering healthy family group activities.

Jaylan is in therapy and a mentoring program at this time. He is in the 6th grade and performs satisfactory work at school. He struggles to complete homework and does not participate in class. He reads and writes below grade level, and math is increasingly difficult. Jaylan does not have any educational needs.

Foster children who have been neglected can have an array of regressive issues.

Miya is nine years old and described as creative and empathetic. Her brother describes her as the peacekeeper of the family. She is quiet and slow to open up, but her kindness is evident when she does. She tends to Martia's wants and needs and often puts her own needs aside.

Animals, music, and art are Miya's favorite things. She loves cats and hopes to have one someday. Miya does not like loud noises or being punished. She has witnessed family violence and gets frightened by yelling and loud voices. It is reported that Miya suffers from regressive issues, including bed-wetting (she wears Pull-Ups), using a teddy bear to comfort herself, and hiding her face when nervous or afraid. She worries about her younger sister and does not trust that caregivers will meet her needs.IMG 1792

Miya does not have any educational needs. She is currently enrolled in individual therapy.

We did not have a foster home for this sibling group.

Sadly, we did not have a foster home in the right location to accommodate all three kids so the referral was passed back to the county. We are truly desperate for more homes in every county location we serve. On average, we receive 45 monthly referrals from counties across the state. We have homes for less than 15% of the children.

Please get in touch with us to learn how to become a foster parent in Wisconsin and help kids like Miya, Jaylan, and Martia.

 

 

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